Song Lyrics

Learning materials and links about interesting song lyrics in English

This section of Camilla’s English Page features songs with interesting lyrics that lend themselves to poetic analysis, along with related media, notes, discussion questions, and blog posts exploring my fascination with and interpretation of them. When I’m lucky enough to have the opportunity, I like to discuss these songs with my students because they function so well as poetry and are quite thought-provoking. Unlike most popular music, many of these songs are characterized by a clear distinction between the speaker and the poet/singer, so they provide examples of how to be psychologically and narratively creative by attempting to inhabit the mind of a character.

Song Lyrics for Analysis and Discussion contains the lyrics for numerous songs not featured below, including songs by Nick Drake, Wilco, and Steve Earle.

Song Lyrics and Discussion Questions

Click on each link below for media, lyrics, and discussion questions for that song.

Billie Holiday

Strange Fruit” holds a unique place in the world of jazz as a political song in an apolitical genre. Sung by one of the greatest singers in American musical history, it paints a stark portrait of white supremacist terrorism with poetic but unflinching lyrics.

Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan’s vast catalog of songs has influenced and been covered by innumerable musicians. Among his overtly political songs, “Masters of War” stands out as a caustic denunciation of the military-industrial complex.

Living Colour

Living Colour’s intense, complex music and politically provocative lyrics made them stand out in the rock music world of the late 80’s, when their long career began. Written from the perspective of a crack dealer, “New Jack Theme” accomplishes the difficult narrative feat of conveying empathy without glorifying or excusing the speaker’s lifestyle.

Pearl Jam

The American rock band Pearl Jam has had a tremendous influence on me as both musicians and socially conscious citizens. “Indifference” is a simple, reflective song that, contrary to its title, conveys fierce resistance in the face of adversity and injustice.

Radiohead

Restlessly inventive, the members of Radiohead seem to enjoy challenging themselves and their listeners with complex songs of diverse styles. “Subterranean Homesick Alien” takes an interesting approach to exploring some of the main themes of the acclaimed album OK Computer: alienation, loneliness, and a sense of the emptiness of the modern world. “Videotape” is a hypnotic meditation on mortality.

Rush

The Canadian progressive rock band Rush is known for both virtuosic musicianship and thought-provoking lyrics. “Subdivisions” reflects on the characteristics of suburbia that both repel people from it and draw them back to it.

Suzanne Vega

The calm, gentle style of most of Suzanne Vega’s music belies the depth and darkness of some of the topics she writes about. “Luka,” her most famous song, is written from the point of view of an abused boy speaking to a neighbor.

Temple of the Dog

The band Temple of the Dog formed as a way of paying tribute to the late singer Andrew Wood when its now-famous members (from Soundgarden and Pearl Jam) were relatively unknown. “Wooden Jesus” comments on the ethical and psychological issues raised by the influence and commercial power of televangelists.

Villagers

The Irish band Villagers is essentially the singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist Conor O’Brien with a cast of touring musicians. Many of Conor’s songs are deeply personal; “The Waves,” written partly in response to the tsunami that struck Japan in 2011, is an example of his more abstract work.

Thoughts on a Song: Indifference by Pearl Jam

As a lover of both literature and music, I find the intersection of the two especially compelling: song lyrics that are artful and interesting enough to be considered poetry. Over the years I've been lucky enough to have the opportunity to discuss a number of my...